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MS Degree For Current Purdue PhD Students

The Department of Economics at Purdue University's Krannert Graduate School of Management offers a non-thesis Master of Science degree in Economics to students who have been admitted into a Ph.D. program at Purdue University. For Economics Ph.D. students, the requirements for this degree are typically met after the third semester in residence. However, the MS in Economics degree has also been awarded to Ph.D. students in the Management Ph.D. program, as well as to Purdue students in other doctoral programs, such as Political Science, Mathematics, Statistics, and Engineering.

Degree Requirements

A student who is enrolled in a Purdue Ph.D. program is eligible to apply for, and receive, a non-thesis Master of Science degree in Economics upon completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours of approved courses. Departmental and University requirements for receiving the Master of Science degree include:

1. The student must complete a dual degree form and an Economics M.S. application. Typically, these are done after a student has completed a substantial portion of the coursework required for the degree.

2. The student must complete a plan of study for the Economics M.S. in the Purdue University Graduate School prior to the start of the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. This is done in consultation with the Economics advisor.

3. The student's M.S. plan of study must include a minimum of 30 credit hours of courses approved by the Economics Department. At least 24 credit hours must be in courses taught in the Economics Department. If a student has a plan of study for another Purdue master's degree, no more than nine Purdue credit hours may overlap on the two plans of study. Coursework used to satisfy the requirements of a master’s degree from an institution other than Purdue may not be used on a Purdue master’s plan of study.

4. Only grades of "A", "B", or "C" (including pluses and minuses) are acceptable in the courses listed on the student's plan of study for the M.S. degree; "Pass/No Pass" type grades are not acceptable. The student must achieve a graduation index of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale across all the courses taken in his/her plan of study for the M.S. degree in Economics.

Typical Plans of Study

There is a great deal of flexibility in putting together an acceptable plan of study. Students should consult with the Economics advisor early in the process.

Students in Management areas typically include the following Economics courses: 606, 607, and 615; some of 609, 610, and 614; many of 670, 671, 672, 673, and 674; additional 600 level field courses. The (up to six credit hours) of coursework outside economics typically consists of Ph.D. courses in the student's management area.

Students in Agricultural Economics typically include the following Economics courses: 606, 607, and 615; some of 609, 610, and 614; many of 670, 671, 672, 673, and 674; additional 600 level field courses in trade or industrial organization. If a student originally entered as a master's student in Agricultural Economics, the student might include Econ 511 and 512. The (up to six credit hours) of coursework outside economics typically consists of Ph.D. courses in Agricultural Economics or Statistics.

An acceptable plan for a student from any other department depends to a great extent on the student's interests and previous coursework in economics. A student without a strong background in economics would be advised to start with Econ 511 and 512. The student might include other 500 level courses in economics taught on campus. [Econ 514 and 515 along with online course sections may not be used on the M.S. plan of study.] Any graded 600 level economics course could be used on the plan of study, though some courses are prerequisites for others. Econ 606, 607, and 615 are prerequisites for many non-econometrics courses. Econ 670, 671, and 672 are prerequisites for many other econometrics courses. Some field courses in economics must be completed in a specific order. The (up to six credit hours) of coursework outside economics typically consists of Ph.D. courses in Statistics or courses in the student's own department that are related to economics. Students should consult with the Economics advisor to determine an appropriate sequence of courses.