Skip to Content Skip to Content

Timeline Years

DCMME | Timeline | Interviews

FOSTERING THE CENTER’S DEVELOPMENT

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED

STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED

A CENTER THAT CELEBRATES MANUFACTURING

Use the years above to take the site back in time and use the menu below for more details about the center during that year.

PROF. DAVID P. JANES

Associate Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Phone: 765-494-9263
Email: janes@ecn.purdue.edu

Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1989
M.S.E.E., University of Illinois, 1981
B.S.E.E., University of Illinois, 1980
B.A., Physics, Augustana College, 1980

From 1981 to 1985, David B. Janes worked as a research scientist at the Research Division of Raytheon Company. At Raytheon, he was involved in research on microwave semiconductor devices, including GaAs IMPATT diodes and MESFETs, and monolithic microwave integrated circuits. His doctoral research focused on the impact of electron traps on the microwave performance of GaAs based signal processing devices (acoustic charge transport devices). Since 1989, he has been at Purdue University, where he is currently an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is also the Deputy Director of the Institute for Nanoelectronics and Computing, a NASA-supported center, and Research Program Coordinator for the Birck Nanotechnology Center. Since joining the Purdue University faculty, he has been engaged in experimental studies on mesoscopic devices and compound semiconductor microwave devices and characterization of novel semiconductor heterostructures, including structures incorporating low-temperature grown GaAs. Current projects include development of molecular electronic components, device applications of nanoscale metallic cluster networks, and development of metal/molecule/semiconductor nanostructures.