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Timeline Years

DCMME | Timeline | Interviews

Here from DCMME Directors through out the years with our library of video interviews.

FOSTERING THE CENTER’S DEVELOPMENT

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED

STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED

A CENTER THAT CELEBRATES MANUFACTURING

Use the years above to take the site back in time and use the menu below for more details about the center during that year.

From Finance and Accounting to ‘Operations Guy’

When Byron Gully joined Krannert’s MBA program in 2000, he had a background in finance and accounting, but no operations experience. DCMME was the “perfect incubator” for what would become his future success, he said. “DCMME provided me with the opportunities for hands-on experience and repeated direct exposure to industry leaders that propelled me into the career that I have today,” he said. He vividly remembers his feelings of fear and uncertainty, as well as excitement, as he passed up a job offer as a financial accounting advisory service consultant at a multinational firm.

“After learning more about the exciting world of manufacturing and operations, and being so enamored with it, the world of accounting just wasn’t going to do!” he said. He made the life-changing decision to apply to Krannert with the hope of starting a successful career in operations. He became heavily involved with DCMME and was subsequently selected as a graduate assistant, giving him valuable exposure to key influencers in manufacturing enterprises. Two companies in particular stood out for him as he considered where he wanted to start his career: Wabtec Corporation and Allison Transmission, Inc. (formerly Allison Transmission, division of General Motors). Both companies gave him the opportunity to conduct case studies in operations at their facilities, offered him internships, and invited him to be part of their companies upon graduation. He ultimately chose Allison Transmission because of Ann Schneider, a DCMME industry partner. “Like many of the DCMME industry partners, Ann became a mentor of mine and then ultimately a champion for me within the organization once I was brought aboard at Allison Transmission,” Gully said. “Through her efforts as an effective champion, I was able to see the world, literally.” He was assigned to the Asia-Pacific Region and, within a month of joining the company, was on an international flight to China, a country he had never visited before. He would spend the next few years traveling internationally for the company and working to develop his operations skills. In 2010, he found a new path in his career, providing operations consulting for the U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) agency within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

For over seven years, he has worked as a consultant to improve the efficiency of service operations to help make the U.S. government more efficient and effective. Outside of work, DCMME has helped him to further develop relationships and experiences with companies and entities he would have never thought of. “This is due in no small part to the specific operational framework that was taught to me through the Krannert operations concentration, and reinforced within me, while an active part of DCMME,” he said. He has conducted operations consulting onsite at some of Club Méditerranée SA’s (Club Med) luxury resorts around the world. He has worked with key influencers at the North American division of Maserati S.p.A to be a part of bringing the first Maserati dealership to Indiana. He has helped two community-enhancing nonprofit entities launch their operations in both Indianapolis and Chicago because leaders of those organizations considered him the “operations guy.” “DCMME has helped to give me a view of the world where discerning the interrelatedness of people, processes and systems is almost second nature,” he said. “Just as important, it has helped me to earn an informal title that brings a smile to my face: the ‘operations guy.’”

“the world of accounting just wasn’t going to do!”