[Skip to Content]
Purdue Master's

Spotlight : Student Global Leader

GEP Student Spotlight

Global Entrepreneurship Program
Indonesia

What were your reasons for choosing the Global Entrepreneurship Program (GEP) at Krannert?

I wanted something to complement my Food Science degree that I can jump straight into after graduation. GEP started in Purdue right around that time when I was looking and I immediately was interested in how dynamic the curriculums are and the fact that the program takes place in 3 different parts of the world. The courses include basic business skills so people like me who are not accustomed to the business language have time to adapt.  

What do you think sets this program apart from other Master’s programs with an entrepreneurship focus?

The dynamicity of the courses. You are learning one thing one week and the next week it’s an entirely different thing. The program brings in speakers from other countries as well. Although some courses can be intense at times, it helps you to always be on your toes.

What has been the most exciting thing about the program so far?

Travelling! It was fun and at the same time it exposes you to just how different each place can be, in terms of food and clothing to even ways of negotiating.

Describe your most rewarding learning experience in the GEP so far.

I’ll have to say it’s a tie between the people and the projects. More than anything, having such a diverse group of friends is a learning experience that I would not have been able to have if I had not entered this program. You learn a lot just by talking to different person each day. The projects, for me, really challenge you to think from so many different points of view. Most of the projects are in their developing stages and it’s exciting to see this project that you take part in makes progress. I learn how entrepreneurs get inspired and how they make decisions as individual and as an entrepreneur. Plus, time management becomes a kind of a must-learn.

Your classmates come from a variety of backgrounds. What have you been able to learn from them?

A whole lot! I learn about their cultures and that way I can start to understand why they would do certain things in such a way. We learn technical skills as well from each other, how to use a certain software, how to better make a flowchart, how to negotiate deals in different ways, even things like how to cook and how to say hello in Chinese and French.

When we catch up with you in 10 years, what do you expect to be doing?

 I think living with so many driven young people around me have inspired me to really work hard towards what I’m passionate for and making an impact in the society.  I want to have had my own business in Indonesia, in the food industry or in event planning, and I want to be able to run an education charity for the people in my country.

If you had three simple pieces of advice for a GEP prospective student, what would they be?

Don’t hesitate to learn from your friends and to try to understand their culture.

 

When people say that’s not studying, that’s travelling, tell them entrepreneurs don’t work behind tables, we geppers study in style.

Get your bonjour and 你好(nihao) right.