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Timeline Years

DCMME | Timeline | Interviews

FOSTERING THE CENTER’S DEVELOPMENT

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

HELPING REVITALIZE U.S. MANUFACTURING

A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

A TRIP TO INDIA & OTHER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED

STUDENT FOCUSED. FACULTY DIRECTED

A CENTER THAT CELEBRATES MANUFACTURING

Use the years above to take the site back in time and use the menu below for more details about the center during that year.

Fall Poster Competition

The student internship poster competition is a key function held within the annual fall operations conference. The competition was created to benefit both industry visitors as well as students by Accomplishing 3 primary objectives:

1. To demonstrate to industry visitors the caliber of summer projects that Krannert students can complete during an internship within a Firm, and to provide an alternative resource for locating student candidates interested in operations and supply chain careers.

2. Provide an opportunity for graduate students to promote their talents and market themselves by visiting with industry and explaining their work experience.

3. Expose undergraduate and 1st-year MBA students to the variety of companies and employment opportunities they might encounter when searching for internship employment themselves. This year twelve students consisting of seven undergraduates and five MBA’s took part in the poster competition. All industry attendees had the opportunity to participate as judges for the competition. Industry judges listened and asked questions as the students shared their internship work experience and summer accomplishments.

Indiana INTERNnet Sponsor’s Choice Award

Ken Ng, BS 2010
Shell Refining Company
SHELL REFINING COMPANY,
PORT DICKSON, MALAYSIA

BACKGROUND:

In the summer of 2009, I joined, as a Finance intern, at one of Royal Dutch Shell’s 34 refineries around the world. The Shell Refining Company at Port Dickson, Malaysia produces a comprehensive range of petroleum products, over 80% of which are consumed within the country. The refinery produces over 150,000 barrels of crude oil each day.

OBJECTIVE:

In these trying economic times, companies small and large are making an eff ort to step up cost effectiveness. Shell Refining Company at Port Dickson is no different. As part of the internship, I assisted in the investigation of root causes of waste within the Global Asset Management Excellence (GAME) framework that leads to inefficiency and higher costs. (The GAME framework is a swim-lane chart illustrating the steps involved with proposing a maintenance execution) In addition, I was also involved with Project Kaizen in identifying any form of potential cost improvements that can be made to reactive maintenance executions, the biggest proportion of the annual operational expenditure at the refinery.

RESULTS:

Following weeks of brainstorming, we took action and further developed our GAME framework by re-delegating certain jobs to different skilled individuals and creating a companywide system that better tracks all past and current job proposals. As for Project Kaizen, a team was formed to evaluate contract workers’ on-site efficiency. This was accomplished by monitoring workers’ hourly paid activities for each job execution, in comparison to the job’s proposed budgeted hours.  

Undergraduate 1st place

Matthew Weirich, BS 2011
ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS

Process Improvement: Non-Inventory Materials

BACKGROUND:

This summer was my third internship; my first at Roche Diagnostics. I completed this internship at Roche’s U.S. headquarters for diagnostics in Indianapolis, Indiana. Roche Diagnostics is a world leader in diagnostics providing innovative and cutting-edge technology to a variety of different markets. The internship was in the kit packaging department working in a process improvement roll

OBJECTIVE:

Non-inventory items in the kit packaging department were unmonitored, disorganized, and many were unnecessary. There was no documented procedure for holding purchasers and venders accountable and therefore the purchasing methods were highly unorganized. The objective of this project was for me to consolidate the non-inventory items, consolidate venders, and create a documented, sustainable procedure for the purchasing and storage of non-inventory items.

RESULTS:

In order to proceed, it was necessary to first locate and document all current non-inventory items and their locations. Then a team was created to meet and consolidate that list to only the necessary items. Storage units were moved, trashed, and created and each item deemed necessary was given a set storage location. Visual controls and minimum/maximum inventory levels were set for each item at each location. Quotes were received from vendors pertaining to the new list of necessary items and the vendors were consolidated from 12 vendors down to 3. A documented purchasing procedure was then created and an informational presentation was given to all factory employees informing them of the changes to the non-inventory items, locations, and procedures. After leading the team through all of these changes, a sustainable end product was created for the non-inventory items. The cost savings from consolidating to only necessary non-inventory items was about $2000 a year and the cost savings by consolidating vendors added another $1000 of savings a year plus newfound purchasing power through increased volumes.  

Graduate 1st Place

Nathan Gross, MBA 2010
TVS MOTOR COMPANY

A Tool to Reduce Variation in Orders to Suppliers While Minimizing Other Costs

BACKGROUND:

TVS Motor Company is the third-largest 2 and 3 wheeler manufacturer in India (and the tenth largest in the world). They make nine models of 2-wheelers (motorcycles) and one 3-wheeler (auto rickshaw). They have seven plants in three cities spread across India (Mysore, Hosur, and Himachal Pradesh). As in many companies, production planning at TVS was time-consuming, intuition-based, and required much implicit knowledge. Every month, the Operations Planning group would examine sales forecasts and update their yearly rolling production plan for all models. Then they would create a three-month rolling plan for all 27 model variants and daily production plans for the following month. While the group was quite adept at developing these plans, they believed we could develop tools to speed up their process and codify some of the implicit knowledge they developed over years of experience.

OBJECTIVE:

Create a tool to speed up production planning while allowing the operator to see explicitly the trade-offs between variation in orders to suppliers, inventory carrying costs, and temporary workforce costs.

RESULTS:

We created an Excel spreadsheet that generated yearly and three-month production plans using sales forecasts, inventory carrying cost rates, hiring costs, productivity rates, and varying work hours. The operator can use the spreadsheet to choose points to change production levels and the spreadsheet will automatically determine production levels to satisfy sales forecasts while maintaining minimum inventory. In doing so, it allows the operator to observe the effect on production rates, inventory levels, inventory carrying cost, and workforce cost.

Others

Nathan Gross, MBA ‘10
TVS MOTORS
Dheeraj Pandey MBA ‘10
CLASSIFIED VENTURES, LLC
Saideep Kolar, MBA ‘10
SEARS
Afza Wajid, MBA ‘10
MOTOROLA INC
Preston Lehman, MBA ‘10
CUMMINS
Maurice Cadenhead, BS MGMT ‘11
DCMME/GSCMI CENTERS
Divya A. Devli, BS MGMT ‘10
VARUN SHIPPING COMPANY
LIMITED
Miguel Juraidini, BS IND. MGMT ‘09
INGERSOLL RAND
Grace Klose, BS IND. MGMT ‘11
TOYOTA MOTOR CORPORATION
Nan Lu, BS MGMT ‘11
IMPRO INDUSTRIES USA INC
Ken Ng, BS ECON ‘10
SHELL REFINING COMPANY
Matthew Weirich, BS IND. MGMT ‘11
ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS